Leah Henderson

Senior Consultant
, BASc, MSc
+1.613.241.1001, ext. 223

Leah is a cross-disciplinarian, an integrator, synthesizer and communicator.

With degrees in systems design engineering (University of Waterloo) and development studies (London School of Economics), and a track record of producing award-winning publications, Leah is adept at integrating different types of knowledge and presenting it in a clear, accessible manner for a broad range of audiences.

“My ability to analyze and synthesize information from technical, environmental and socio-economic sources is important to help clients make well-informed decisions,” she says.

Leah works with both private and public sector clients, providing a variety of services, including risk management, program design and implementation, and research, analysis and report writing.

Her clients include: Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, Agnico-Eagle Mines, Syncrude, and the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business.

“I enjoy connecting with diverse organizations and individuals to help them understand and more effectively address complex environmental and societal challenges,” Leah says.

Joined Stratos: 2014

Education:

  • Masters of Science, Development Studies, London School of Economics, 2013
  • Bachelor of Applied Science, Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, 2012

What Leah offers:

Leah brings an understanding of the technical, environmental and socio-economic challenges faced by the natural resource sector today. She integrates knowledge from and communicates with multiple disciplines to help solve complex problems.  

Leah works with natural resource companies, federal and territorial governments, and not-for-profit organizations.

Her clients include: Mining Association of Canada, Agnico-Eagle Mines, Syncrude, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Yukon Government, and Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business.

Leah has provided the following services to Stratos clients:

  • Risk management: Coordinating, co-facilitating and reporting on risk update workshops for large, complex extractive sector sites. She has also provided advice for and developed risk criteria, procedures, and reporting and communication processes and tools.
  • Socio-economic services: Researching, analyzing and synthesizing local and regional socio-economic baseline information. She has also supported the development of key documents such as: current state assessments, socio-economic strategies, socio-economic implementation plans, labour capacity studies and socio-economic monitoring reports.
  • Program design and implementation: Designing and implementing key technical review processes for the federal government’s abandoned mine sites. She has also acted as secretariat for governments and industry associations, managing documents, handling meeting logistics, keeping meeting records and tracking recommendations.
  • Research, Analysis and Report Writing: Summarizing technical and non-technical information into accessible reports for multi-disciplinary audiences. Examples include developing mineral resource development profiles for Nunavut regions for the Natural Resources Canada, synthesizing Canadian Aboriginal business needs for the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business, and summarizing mine closure best practices for the Project Technical Office at Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada.

“Capacity building for Aboriginal businesses and managing socio-economic elements of mine closure are two issue areas I’m particularly interested in,” says Leah.

When not working, Leah is usually out exploring the Ottawa region, its parks and its history.